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Courses

Winter 2024 –  Graduate Timetable

Course Code Course Title Day and Time

Professor

CATH 8000

Foundations of Catholic Thought Asynchronous

Dr. John Cappucci

CATH 8200

Catholicism and Dialogue Synchronous and Online

Dr. Michael VanZandt Collins

CATH 8800

Directed Readings in Catholic Studies Independent Study with Faculty Supervision    Faculty Supervisor
CATH 9000 Major Paper in Catholic Studies Independent Research with Faculty Supervision    Faculty Supervisor

 

Spring 2024 –  Graduate Timetable (Tentative)

Course Code Course Title Day and Time

Professor

CATH 8900

Capstone in Catholic Studies Tuesdays and Thursdays  6:00-8:50 PM

    Dr. Adam Iannetta 

CATH 8800

Directed Readings in Catholic Studies Independent Study with Faculty Supervision    Faculty Supervisor
CATH 9000 Major Paper in Catholic Studies Independent Research with Faculty Supervision   Faculty Supervisor

Course Titles and Descriptions

Foundations of Catholic Thought: CATH 8000 (3.00 Credit) – This course provides students with a thematic overview of the major components of Catholic thought. Students will explore key Catholic concepts, such as the nature of the divine, the mission of Jesus, Mariology, sacraments, communion of saints and liturgy. Students will also study the major scriptural, theological, philosophical, literary, and artistic works that helped to shape and express Catholicism.

 

Catholicism and Social Justice: CATH 8100 (3.00 Credit) – This course will examine the social justice tradition within the Catholic Church with emphasis on the “life and dignity of the human person.” In this course, students will explore how the Church engages with a host of social justice issues, such as poverty and homelessness, immigration, refugees and asylees, labour, human rights, reconciliation with Indigenous communities, the environment, and war and the pursuit of global peace.

 

Catholicism and Dialogue: CATH 8200 (3.00 Credit) – This course studies Catholicism’s ecumenical and interfaith initiatives with a focus on mutual understanding, acceptance, and healing. This course will explore the Church’s interactions with several traditions, including Anglicanism, Protestantism, Orthodoxy, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Atheism. This course will also discuss the Church’s path towards reconciliation with Indigenous communities both in Canada and abroad.

 

Topics in Catholic Studies: CATH 8500 (3.00 Credit) – This course will focus on special topics on interest in Catholic studies, such as, bioethics, education, literature, global poverty, migration, the saints, the papacy, social teachings, and theology of the body. This course’s content will change on a yearly basis. Students may obtain credit for this course a maximum of twice provided that the course topic has changed.

 

Directed Readings in Catholic Studies: CATH 8800 (3.00 Credit) – This course will allow students to study a specific topic not covered in detail by a course currently offered in the program. The students will select a topic and readings in consultation with an instructor. It is required that students have weekly content and complete a final project at the conclusion of the course. Typically, students will be permitted to complete this course once and only with permission from the Graduate Chair.

 

Catholic Studies Capstone Project: CATH 8900 (3.00 Credit) – This practice-based capstone course will require students to design a workshop on any area related to Catholic studies. In preparation for developing this workshop, students will actively participate in a series of sessions facilitated by guest experts on public speaking skills, engaging audiences, designing appealing presentations, and discussing difficult subjects.  After completing these sessions, students will begin an independent research project with the goal of facilitating a workshop in the community. This course is graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Admission is with permission of the Graduate Chair.

 

Major Paper in Catholic Studies: CATH 9000 (3.00 Credit) – This course will provide students with an opportunity to undertake an independent research project on any topic related to Catholic studies with the goal of writing a major paper that perhaps could be submitted to a refereed journal or edited book. In the course, students will submit a formal proposal that includes research questions, literature review, methods, and a preliminary bibliography. After writing the paper, students will be required to present their paper at an oral defense. Admission is with permission of the Graduate Chair.